UN Sanctions Committee

Chapter VII of the Charter of the United Nations allows the UN Security Council to adopt coercive measures to maintain or restore international peace and security. Those measures range from economic or other sanctions that do not entail the use of armed forces to international military intervention.
The imposition of mandatory sanctions is aimed at exerting pressure on a State or entity to attain the goals set by the Security Council without resorting to the use of force.
The Council has used mandatory sanctions as a coercive instrument where peace has been threatened and diplomatic efforts have failed (see below). Sanctions have included broad economic and trade sanctions or more selective measures, such as arms embargos, travel prohibitions, financial or diplomatic restrictions, or both.
Article 25 of the UN Charter provides that the Members of the Organization “agree to accept and carry out the decisions of the Security Council in accordance with the present Charter.”
Law No. 24,080 and Presidential Decree No. 1521/04 set forth the manner in which the decisions adopted by the Security Council in the exercise of the powers granted to it by Chapter VII of the Charter are to be incorporated into the Argentine legal system, including their dissemination through the web site of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Sanctions Committees:
Article 29 of the Charter sets out that the Security Council may establish subsidiary bodies as needed for the performance of its functions. This is also reflected in Rule 28 of the Council’s Provisional Rules of Procedure.
As a result, the Council has established different Committees to follow up on the various sanctions regimes imposed through Council Resolutions. The Committees currently operating are listed below.
By clicking on each of them, the national rules relating to them will be displayed.